Don't just vote down the ballot. Be on the ballot. Break the ballot.

Meet the
Ballot Breakers

We’re seeing young people running for office in droves, seizing the opportunity to take control of their futures and give voice to the people who aren’t being represented in today’s government. These candidates are breaking tradition, transforming what it means to be a candidate.

Ballot Breakers seeks to authentically showcase these energized young people, all of whom come from diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and platforms. Ballot Breakers don’t just represent their generation -- they represent their constituents, communities and progressive values throughout the country.

 

We’re seeing young people running for office in droves, seizing the opportunity to take control of their futures and give voice to the people who aren’t being represented in today’s government. These candidates are breaking tradition, transforming what it means to be a candidate.

Ballot Breakers seeks to authentically showcase these energized young people, all of whom come from diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and platforms. Ballot Breakers don’t just represent their generation -- they represent their constituents, communities and progressive values throughout the country.

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Ellen Kamei, 34

While many have flocked to Silicon Valley in the last few years, Ellen Kamei’s family has lived in Mountain View for three generations. She is now a Mountain View City Councilmember, making her hometown livable and inclusive for newcomers and long-time residents.

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Rigel Robinson, 22

A Berkeley resident by way of Missouri, Rigel Robinson is City Councilmember for Berkeley’s 7th district, the first student supermajority district in the entire country.  Rigel was a key figure in the movement that brought the first UC tuition rollback since 1999 and he is hoping to continue advocating for student needs.

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Jorge Pacheco Jr., 28

Jorge Pacheco Jr. attended K-8 schools in the Oak Grove School District, but left feeling unprepared and ill-equipped for high school. Now a successful teacher who launched the first middle school ethnic studies program in San Jose, Jorge is now an Oak Grove School Board.